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This Month's BLINK
A Traumatic Epiretinal Membrane
Written by Wael M. El-Haig, MBBS, MD, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
Edited by Michael P. Kelly, CPT.

Photo by Wael M. El-Haig, MBBS, MD, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
 
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(PDF 288 KB)

March 2011 Blink

Parents of a 5-year-old boy noticed that their son’s left eye had become exotropic. The only relevant history was a fall off a nine-foot balcony a year prior that produced no injury.

On examination, vision in the right eye was normal but in the left was hand motions only. Fundus examination of the left eye revealed an epimacu­lar glial proliferation with extension to the optic disc. The retinal periphery was normal. There were subretinal punctiform hard exudates in the posterior pole and nasal to the optic disc due to traction from the epimacular membrane. The yellow disc at the center of the macula is the luteal pigment of the fovea that prolapsed through an opening in the epimacular membrane.

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