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May 2011

 
This Month's BLINK
Kaye Dots
Written by Anthony Kuo, MD, Terry Kim, MD, and Michael P. Kelly, CPT, Duke University Eye Center, Durham, N.C.

Photo by Michael P. Kelly, CPT, Duke University Eye Center, Durham, N.C.
 
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May 2011 Blink

A 22-year-old Caucasian male presented for a routine post­operative appointment seven weeks after uncomplicated penetrating keratoplasty. The surgery had been performed to remove a vision-impairing corneal scar from herpes zoster kera­titis. His BCVA was 20/25, and he was on topical prednisolone acetate and cyclosporine.

This high-magnification slit-lamp image depicts discrete whit­ish dots in the peripheral donor tissue. These are Kaye dots, which are typically found in the depressed zone close to the swol­len edge of the donor tissue. These dots usually appear one or two months after transplantation—though they may appear earlier.

The Kaye dots are not an indication of infection or tissue rejection; they are the result of epithelial cell degeneration and generally disappear over several weeks after removal of the related sutures.

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