EyeNet Magazine



   
 
What Is This Month's Mystery Condition?
Written by Eleonora G. Lad, MD, PHD, Prithvi Mruthyunjaya, MD, and James Crowell, OCT-C, Duke Eye Center, Durham, N.C. Edited by Michael P. Kelly, FOPS.

Photo by James Crowell, OCT-C, Duke Eye Center, Durham, N.C.
 
Academy members: login to read or make comments on this article.
 

(PDF 180 KB)

June 2012 Blink

Amelanotic Iris Nevus

A 54-year-old woman was referred to us for evaluation of an iris lesion that had been slowly enlarging for nine years. She was completely asymptomatic.

Anterior segment examination revealed an elevated, amelanotic iris lesion that measured 4 x 2.3 mm and appeared gelatinous and highly vascularized. It did not extend to involve the angle, as viewed on gonioscopy. The lesion caused peaking of the pupil and ectropion uveae. The remainder of the examination was normal.

A fluorescein angiogram revealed prominent vascularity of the iris lesion. An anterior segment B-scan showed that the mass was limited to the iris stroma and did not distort the iris pigment epithelium; there was no involvement of the ciliary body. An incisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of amelanotic iris nevus.

Top

BLINK SUBMISSIONS: Send us your ophthalmic image and its explanation in 150-250 words. E-mail to eyenet@aao.org, fax to 415-561-8575 or mail to EyeNet Magazine, 655 Beach Street, San Francisco, CA 94109. Please note that EyeNet reserves the right to edit Blink submissions.

Top



Academy members: login to read or make comments on this article.
About Us Academy Jobs Privacy Policy Contact Us Terms of Service Medical Disclaimer Site Index