EyeNet Magazine
Managing Vitreomacular Interface Diseases

Although there have been many advances in the treatment of vitreomacular interface diseases, viewpoints differ on the best approaches, particularly the current role of pharmacologic vitreolysis.

Here's a look at the options and challenges.

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EyeNet introduces its brand new mobile-optimized digital edition all the benefits of the print edition, plus digital enhancements.

Read on a break at work, kicking back at home with our iPad, or on your phone while in line at the grocery store. Check it out.

 
 
 
Multimedia Extra: Feature
The slideshow above presents selected vitreomacular pathology with pre- and post-treatment images.

Read more. In this month’s feature, four experts weigh in on what to consider when helping patients decide on their course of treatment.

Video courtesy of Nancy M. Holekamp, MD.

 
 
 
 
May 2014 Blink
Blink
 
 
Morning Rounds

The Mysterious "Wiggle" at 10 O'Clock

The 56-year-old schoolteacher noted a “wiggle” in his vision every time he ate sweets or drank coffee. It happened simultaneously in both eyes after ingestion of the trigger substances and usually resolved after he took ibuprofen.

However, with the most recent episode, he experienced the wiggle with no relief for five weeks. He went for an eye exam and was diagnosed with an epiretinal membrane and posterior vitreous detachment.

What’s your diagnosis?

May 2014 Morning Rounds
 
 
Opinion

Choosing Up Sides: Will You Be Left Out?

Déjà vu! Here we are in 2014, and health insurance companies are choosing up sides just as if we were still in camp.

But it isn’t baseball this time—it’s the health insurance game, and the stakes are much higher: the professional livelihoods of those who aren’t chosen. And now the insurers are putting together panels that include only the most cost-effective providers and hospitals (according to their definitions).

May 2014 Opinion
 
 
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